Fish fingers put to the test: four products fail – fatty substances discovered

  • ofMaria Dirschauer

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Öko-Test has checked 20 brands of fish fingers for harmful substances. Four products failed the test, seven were rated “very good”.

Frozen fish sticks* are quick and easy: get out of the freezer, fry in the pan, done. Mashed potatoes and salad, for example, go well with this. They are also a popular way for picky children to eat fish. When shopping, you have a large selection of brands, from discounter products to organic manufacturers. Öko-Test compared 20 fish fingers and stated: Not all products are recommended. Four were rated “poor” or “unsatisfactory” overall. Reasons are both problematic ingredients, as well as fishing methods and origin of the fish.

Öko-Test examines fish fingers: Many brands recommendable

Brands from supermarkets, discounters, organic stores and frozen food delivery services were tested. Accordingly, the prices of the fish fingers vary significantly: you can pay between 1.99 euros and 8.98 euros for 450 grams. Öko-Test checked the products for mineral oil components, fatty pollutants and chlorate. In addition, the preparation odor, taste and mouthfeel played a role in the evaluation.

The good news: All of the fish fingers tested are free from mineral oil components. These are otherwise very often found in food tests, for example in frozen pizza and toasted bread. Also Bacterial contamination with listeria were not discovered in the laboratory. 15 fish finger products received the in the test Grades “good” or “very good”. They are free of questionable ingredients, come from sustainable fishing and the supply chains are transparent. The test winners include:

  • the fish fingers in organic breading from the sustainable brand Followfish,
  • the fish fingers from Bofrost,
  • the salmon sticks from Käpt‘n Iglo and
  • the Wild Oceans Pollack fish fingers from Demeter field products.

Also read: Toast bread in the test: contamination with mineral oil – two breads fail.

Four brands of fish fingers fail the eco-test – despite the MSC label, problematic fishing methods

Four products failed the Öko-Test and received the Grades “poor” or “unsatisfactory”. Including the fish fingers from Eismann and the second product tested by Iglo. Reason were discovered Fatty pollutants, especially 3-MCPDwhich can lead to early kidney damage. Surprisingly, the organic food brand’s fish fingers also fell Alnatura in the test, mainly because of the Fishing method. The saithe is caught with bottom trawls, which leads to the destruction of ecosystems and is considered a highly problematic fishing method.

Öko-Test points out that even fish with labels like MSC or Naturland Wildfisch may have been caught with destructive bottom trawls. All 20 fish finger products tested have the MSC (Marine Stewardship Council) label, which is used for sustainable fishing stands. The question of whether you can eat fish and fish fingers with a clear conscience must be asked by yourself. In fish fingers is mostly Alaska pollock which is more closely related to cod than to real wild salmon. According to the WWF species lexicon, it is the most eaten fish in Germany. Environmental protection associations classify saithe as “unsustainable”, however, the Greenpeace fish guide advises against this fish species completely, as reported by Utopia. Of the fish fingers tested, only the Iglo salmon fingers are made from real wild salmon.

Also interesting: Frozen pizza put to the test: harmful substances found in salami pizzas – one fails completely.

Video: Homemade fish fingers – it’s that easy

Those: oekotest.de

(mad) * Merkur.de is part of the nationwide Ippen-Digital editors network.

Continue reading: Chocolate at Ökotest: Popular brand crashes through.

Why eating fish is so healthy

In contrast to freshwater fish, marine fish contain a lot of iodine.  Photo: Manuela Rüther / dpa-tmn
In contrast to freshwater fish, marine fish contain a lot of iodine. Photo: Manuela Rüther / dpa-tmn © Manuela Rüther
High-fat fish species such as salmon have a far higher proportion of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids than low-fat species.  Photo: Kai Remmers / dpa-tmn
High-fat fish species such as salmon have a far higher proportion of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids than low-fat species. Photo: Kai Remmers / dpa-tmn © Kai Remmers
Five fried fish fingers provide an average of 80 percent of the amount of fat that children should eat at most during a main meal.  It is better to bake them in the oven.  Photo: Karl-Josef Hildenbrand / dpa-tmn
Five fried fish fingers provide an average of 80 percent of the amount of fat that children should eat at most during a main meal. It is better to bake them in the oven. Photo: Karl-Josef Hildenbrand / dpa-tmn © Karl-Josef Hildenbrand
Redfish is one of the low-fat fish species.  Photo: Florian Schuh / dpa-tmn
Redfish is one of the low-fat fish species. Photo: Florian Schuh / dpa-tmn © Florian Schuh
Ute Schröder is a certified food chemist at the Max Rubner Institute (MRI), the Federal Research Institute for Nutrition and Food. Photo: Ruthe Zuntz / MRI / dpa-tmn
Ute Schröder is a certified food chemist at the Max Rubner Institute (MRI), Federal Research Institute for Nutrition and Food. Photo: Ruthe Zuntz / MRI / dpa-tmn © Ruthe Fiber

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