Montgomery’s Military Leadership – Imperial Community

Regarding the military talents of Montgomery, the opinion is sharply negative.
In David Rolfe’s excellent book “Bloody Road to Tunis” Monti is shown in all its glory. The level of tactical thinking during WWI. Slow. Uncertain. Easily panicked.

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I like this excerpt from the preface of the Patients to this book:

However, in order for the army to act effectively, it needs, if not a brilliant, then at least a normal commander. Can we say the same about Montgomery? Not sure. If you look at all of Montgomery’s operations, from El Alamein to operations in Europe, it turns out that he knew only one tactic: a frontal strike with vastly superior forces. Moreover, even this blow was always organized not in the best way. Can you name at least one operation in which Montgomery’s troops broke through enemy defenses on the move? Me not. I remember that Monty always had to throw both two and three blows to get his way. Even the famous El Alamein is no exception to this. And finally, the attempt to break through the Maret line is puzzling. Montgomery has a whole army in his hands, and two battalions are sent to storm a heavily fortified position! On the other hand, two corps are standing and waiting for the development of events, “in order to enter the breakthrough.”
No wonder in the book “The Man Who Arrested the Queen and Dissolved Parliament” a retired captain says to the current field marshal: “Now get out of here quickly. In a couple of minutes my sergeant will come in, he fought under your command in Africa”.

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I like this excerpt from the preface of the Patients to this book:

However, in order for the army to act effectively, it needs, if not a brilliant, then at least a normal commander. Can we say the same about Montgomery? Not sure. If you look at all of Montgomery’s operations, from El Alamein to operations in Europe, it turns out that he knew only one tactic: a frontal strike with vastly superior forces. Moreover, even this blow was always organized not in the best way. Can you name at least one operation in which Montgomery’s troops broke through enemy defenses on the move? Me not. I remember that Monty always had to throw both two and three blows to get his way. Even the famous El Alamein is no exception to this. And finally, the attempt to break through the Maret line is puzzling. Montgomery has a whole army in his hands, and two battalions are sent to storm a heavily fortified position! On the other hand, two corps are standing and waiting for the development of events, “in order to enter the breakthrough.”
No wonder in the book “The Man Who Arrested the Queen and Dissolved Parliament” a retired captain says to the current field marshal: “Now get out of here quickly. In a couple of minutes my sergeant will come in, he fought under your command in Africa”.

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