Outstanding biologist of Dominican origin is listed in Wikipedia

Leads research team on marine beings and their diseases

Rebecca Vega Thurber is an ecologist, reef and marine animal microbiologist. She has been an associate professor at Oregon State University since 2020 and a team leader for the Tara Pacific expedition and a co-producer of the coral reef documentary “Saving Atlantis.”

Vega, of Dominican origin, leads a research team, on issues of virology, microbiology and ecology of marine diseases. Investigate how bacteria, viruses and other microorganisms interact with and regulate marine ecosystems. Currently executing projects focused on tropical reefs and deep-sea ecosystems.

Source. According to the profile posted on Wikipedia, Vega-Thurber was born in 1975. She is the daughter of Eduardo Luis Vega (brother of Dominican historian Bernardo Vega) and Patricia Ann Vega from Phoenix, Arizona, USA. Her father was a doctor and emigrated to the United States from the Dominican Republic. His mother is a retired nurse.

He grew up in Tucson, Arizona. He graduated from The Gregory High School. He received a double bachelor’s degree in Marine Biology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology from the University of California at Santa Cruz and a Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from Stanford University.

Scientific career. Vega received a grant from the US National Science Foundation to conduct research at the University of San Diego on coral virology and microbiology. Her first appointment as a professor was in the Department of Biology at Florida International University.

Later she moved to the State of Oregon in the Department of Microbiology at the university where she is an associate professor, holding the Pernot Distinguished Chair.

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Vega Thurber began her research career as a developmental biologist, studying apoptosis (a pathway of destruction or cell death programmed or caused by the same organism) of a type of sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus). During his postdoctoral years he shifted his focus to the science of coral reefs and viruses and bacteria. He found that corals contain unique sets of viruses that play a role in their health.

Together with other scientists, he has discovered the main roles that microbial assemblages play in coral reef environments. Her position as a world expert in coral microbiology led to her being named one of the principal scientists of the Tara Pacif expedition.

She has mentored 10 PhDs and 8 Postdocs and dozens of microbiology students. It has been recognized by various entities and has written various articles.

Rebecca Vega Thurber is an ecologist, reef and marine animal microbiologist. She has been an associate professor at Oregon State University since 2020 and a team leader for the Tara Pacific expedition and co-producer of the coral reef documentary “Saving Atlantis.”

Vega, of Dominican origin, leads a research team, on issues of virology, microbiology and ecology of marine diseases. Investigate how bacteria, viruses and other microorganisms interact with and regulate marine ecosystems. Currently executing projects focused on tropical reefs and deep-sea ecosystems.

Source. According to the profile posted on Wikipedia, Vega-Thurber was born in 1975. She is the daughter of Eduardo Luis Vega (brother of Dominican historian Bernardo Vega) and Patricia Ann Vega from Phoenix, Arizona, USA. Her father was a doctor and emigrated to the United States from the Dominican Republic. His mother is a retired nurse.

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He grew up in Tucson, Arizona. He graduated from The Gregory High School. He received a double bachelor’s degree in Marine Biology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology from the University of California at Santa Cruz and a Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from Stanford University.

Scientific career. Vega received a grant from the US National Science Foundation to conduct research at the University of San Diego on coral virology and microbiology. Her first appointment as a professor was in the Department of Biology at Florida International University.

Later she moved to the State of Oregon in the Department of Microbiology at the university where she is an associate professor, holding the Pernot Distinguished Chair.

Vega Thurber began her research career as a developmental biologist, studying apoptosis (a pathway of destruction or cell death programmed or caused by the same organism) of a type of sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus). During his postdoctoral years he shifted his focus to the science of coral reefs and viruses and bacteria. He found that corals contain unique sets of viruses that play a role in their health.

Together with other scientists, he has discovered the main roles that microbial assemblages play in coral reef environments. Her position as a world expert in coral microbiology led to her being named one of the principal scientists of the Tara Pacif expedition.

She has mentored 10 PhDs and 8 Postdocs and dozens of microbiology students. It has been recognized by various entities and has written various articles.

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