We are here | National Geographic Japan version site

Quana Rose Chasing Horse, an indigenous model active in the fashion world. She is of the blood of the tribes Han Guitchin and Sikangu (Oglala) Lakota, but she was born in Dene (Navajo), a tribe in Arizona. This photo was taken at Tsebinjisugai (Monument Valley) managed by Dene. (PHOTOGRAPH BY KILIII YÜYAN)

The movement for sovereignty of Native Americans is gaining momentum in the United States and Canada. To regain the land and culture of our ancestors, enact our own laws, and stick to our own way of life.

Chapter 1 Regaining Land

Kuraokuiato(British Columbia, Canada)

Red cedar (Western red cedar) square lumber with a length of 2 meters, a height of 1 meter, and a width of 1 meter. Gordon Dick, a wood carver, was about to cut off the rounded top with a chainsaw. Then, another craftsman, Joe Martin, bends down and checks the path of the blade.

Martin is from Krao Quiat, an indigenous people living on the west coast of Vancouver Island, Canada. He is first roughly cutting the lumber to make a low totem pole in the shape of a wolf. There are two larger totem poles by the side. Both are carved with symbolic statues. Bears, the sun, mythical sea snakes, and wolves.

Martin intended to set up a totem pole this summer in the village of Opitzat, the birthplace of his clan on Meares Island, off the west coast of Vancouver Island. There used to be hundreds of books in the village, but in 1884 a law was passed in Canada to allow collectors and museums to take away the totem poles, and they were taken out in large numbers. Martin tells us that totem poles represent the teachings of our ancestors to the indigenous people, but they also mean more. He declares, “We are here. This is our land.”

This totem pole is set up in the village of Opitzat on the island of Mears to convey the recent history of Krao Quiat. The skull on the far right represents the victims of the new Corona, a student who died in a boarding school, and an indigenous woman who was killed or missing. “Europeans despise us who can’t read, but they too couldn’t read the words of the totem pole,” says Joe Martin, who directs the production of the totem pole. (PHOTOGRAPH BY KILIII YÜYAN)

See Also:  In the cinema: “Son of the South” about a white comrade-in-arms - culture

Mears Island is part of the land where the ancestors of Krao Quiat lived. The Government of Canada considers this 1,000-square-kilometer area to be a mix of public, private, and small indigenous settlements, but Krao Quiat has and still claims to be their own land, all over the tribe. It is designated as a park.

Many forests in this area are desolate due to heavy felling. A timber company cut down precious old cedar trees from one end, leaving soil spills and later wasteland.

Saya Maso, who oversees natural resources at the Klaoquiat Nation (autonomous government), said: “That was 50 years ago. Since then, neither the company, the Government of British Columbia, nor the Federal Government of Canada has tried to regenerate the forest, so we are working on that job.”

Joe Louis carries cedar wood to repair the promenade. This is the entrance to a tribal park on Meares Island in British Columbia, Canada. The indigenous Krao Quiat Nation (autonomous government) has effectively controlled the island since the 1980s. Currently, Louis et al. Park protection pipes are in charge of conservation.  (PHOTOGRAPH BY KILIII YÜYAN)

Joe Louis carries cedar wood to repair the promenade. This is the entrance to a tribal park on Meares Island in British Columbia, Canada. The indigenous Krao Quiat Nation (autonomous government) has effectively controlled the island since the 1980s. Currently, Louis et al. Park protection pipes are in charge of conservation. (PHOTOGRAPH BY KILIII YÜYAN)

Kraoquiat restores dammed river flows, regenerates pre-logging ecosystems, and protects herring spawning grounds. In addition, we have been working on building the foundation for Nation. He has created his own educational program and hired his own ranger called a park guardian. In addition, we have introduced a mechanism to collect donations that support Nation’s activities in the form of a consumption tax. Persuade the business to voluntarily add 1% of the amount billed to the customer.

See Also:  NFL - Rams quarterback Jared Goff to miss last game against Cardinals

Next page: A new attempt is fetal movement throughout the North American continent

From here onward, “National Geographic Japan Version”
Subscriber (subscriberMonthly / yearOnly available.

Subscriber (subscriberMonthly / year)If,

  • 1

    In addition to the latest issue, back numbers after the March 2013 issueCan be read at any time

  • 2National Geographic Japanese version site
    Limited article,I can read everything

Recommended related books

July 2022 issue

Wild animals living in the city / We are here / A beloved village that disappears into the sea / The Reviving Appian Way / The world of autochrome

From coyotes to bears, there are animals that live well in the immediate vicinity of humans as their natural habitat shrinks. Reported in the special feature “Wild animals living in the city”. In addition, we will deliver five special features such as Java Island in Indonesia, where the coastal area is heavily submerged, and the Appian Way in ancient Rome, which is being revived by the Italian government.

List price: 1,210 yen (tax included)

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.